Translational Research

Translational Research

Translational research that has been a tradition in medical sciences and is now being increasingly used in neuroscience, holds great potential for a similar framework for applied psychology. However, focused translational research is still rare in this field. In an effort to produce innovative treatments, the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) has placed strong emphasis on translational research. NIMH provides the following definition:


“Translational research in the behavioral and social sciences addresses how basic behavioral processes inform the diagnosis, prevention, treatment, and delivery of services for mental illness, and, conversely, how knowledge of mental illness increases our understanding of basic behavioral processes” (National Advisory Mental Health Council, 2000, p. iii).


As translational research includes two areas of translation – application of laboratory research to preclinical and clinical trials and adoption of best practices. The second area is what this project is concerned with, research aimed at enhancing the adoption of best practices in the community, (National Institutes of Health, 2007). The goal is to connect scientific thinking to application that translates into meaningful outcomes, succinctly captured in the phrase “from bench to bedside.”


In our pursuit to do Translational Research in this project, we have already made a beginning.

  1. Singh, K., Jain, A., & Singh, D. (2013). Satsang: A culture specific effective practice for well-being. In Helena Agueda Marujo & Luis Miguel Neto (Eds.), Positive Nations and Communities - Collective, Qualitative and Cultural-Sensitive Processes in Positive Psychology (pp. 79 – 100). Dordrecht: Springer.

  2. Singh, K., Singh, D., Mitra, S., Junnarkar, M. & Dayal, P. (2016). Effect on well-being of spiritual practices among Elderly Rural Women. Mid-Year Conference on Psychology, Spirituality and Religion, Society for the Psychology of Religion and Spirituality (APA Div. 36) and St. Joseph's College, New York, USA , 11-12th March 2016.

  3. Singh Kamlesh, Singh Dalbir & Shokeen B (2016). Well-being enhancing message in religion and spiritual folk songs: A rural women study. Mid-Year Conference on Psychology, Spirituality and Religion, Society for the Psychology of Religion and Spirituality (APA Div. 36) and St. Joseph's College, New York, USA , 11-12th March 2016.

More details are available: here


Projects already completed to understand adolescents’ mental health, resilience and their indicators with reference to socio-demographic variables:

  1. Relationship of Demographic Variables, Socio-Cultural Issues and Selected Psychological Constructs with the Positive Mental Health of North Indian Adolescents (ICMR, 2012-14)

  2. The Impact of Socio-demographic Factors on Resilience in North Indian Adolescents (ICSSR, 2015-2016)


Main prospective objectives of the current project:

  1. To translate psychological principles and theories – in an effort to better the quality of life in rural communities.
  2. To prepare awareness programmes on mental health issues.
  3. To highlight the socio-cultural practices in the community, which have significant impact on individuals’ well-being.

Team Members

Kamlesh Singh (PhD, Psychology)
Associate Professor
Dept. of Humanities & Social Sciences
Indian institute of Technology (IIT) Delhi,
New Delhi - 110 016, India
Contact: 91-0-9968363625 (M)
E-mail: singhk@hss.iitd.ac.in
singhk.iitd@gmail.com
http://web.iitd.ac.in/~singhk/

Dalbir Singh, (PhD Geography)
Associate Professor,
Pt. N.R.S. Government College, Rohtak, Haryana
Contact: 09050040404 (M) Email: dlbrhooda@gmail.com

Suman
Ph.D. (English Literature)
Assistant Professor, School of Humanities and Social Sciences,
IIT Mandi, Mandi – 175005, India
# 91-1905-267140, Email: suman.sigroha@gmail.com
Web: http://faculty.iitmandi.ac.in/~sumansigroha/